A+ R A-

DigitalNews - TodayWorld

E-mail Print PDF

Sherpas leave Everest; some expeditions nix climbs

Associated PressBy BINAJ GURUBACHARYA | Associated Press – 1 hour 33 minutes ago
Relatives of mountaineers, killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest, cry during the funeral ceremony in Katmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 21, 2014. Buddhist monks cremated the remains of Sherpa guides who were buried in the deadliest avalanche ever recorded on Mount Everest, a disaster that has prompted calls for a climbing boycott by Nepal's ethnic Sherpa community. The avalanche killed at least 13 Sherpas. Three other Sherpas remain missing and are presumed dead. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha) Daughter of Nepalese mountaineer Ang Kaji Sherpa, killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest, cries during the funeral ceremony in Katmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 21, 2014. Buddhist monks cremated the remains of Sherpa guides who were buried in the deadliest avalanche ever recorded on Mount Everest, a disaster that has prompted calls for a climbing boycott by Nepal's ethnic Sherpa community. The avalanche killed at least 13 Sherpas. Three other Sherpas remain missing. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha) FILE - In this May 18, 2003 file photo, mountaineers pass through the treacherous Khumbu Icefall on their way to Mount Everest near Everest Base camp, Nepal. The Khumbu Icefall is a river of ice, a kilometer or so of constantly shifting glacier punctuated by deep crevasses and overhanging immensities of ice that can be as large as 10-story buildings and can move six feet in just one day. Crossing it can take 12 hours. On Friday, April 18, 2014, a piece of glacier sheared away from the mountain, setting off an avalanche of ice that killed 16 Sherpa guides as they ferried clients’ equipment up the mountain. (AP Photo/Gurinder Osan, File)
A Buddhist monk lights the funeral pyre of Nepalese climber Ang Kaji Sherpa killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest, in Katmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 21, 2014. Buddhist monks cremated the remains of Sherpa guides who were buried in the deadliest avalanche ever recorded on Mount Everest, a disaster that has prompted calls for a climbing boycott by Nepal's ethnic Sherpa community. The avalanche killed at least 13 Sherpas. Three other Sherpas remain missing and are presumed dead. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha) A relative of one of the Nepalese climbers killed in an avalanche on Mount Everest, cries during the funeral ceremony in Katmandu, Nepal, Monday, April 21, 2014. Buddhist monks cremated the remains of Sherpa guides who were buried in the deadliest avalanche ever recorded on Mount Everest, a disaster that has prompted calls for a climbing boycott by Nepal's ethnic Sherpa community. The avalanche killed at least 13 Sherpas. Three other Sherpas remain missing and are presumed dead. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

KATMANDU, Nepal (AP) — Dozens of Sherpa guides packed up their tents and left Mount Everest's base camp Wednesday, after the deaths of 16 of their colleagues in an avalanche exposed an undercurrent of resentment by Sherpas over their pay, treatment and benefits.

With the entire climbing season increasingly thrown into doubt, the government quickly announced that top tourism officials would fly to base camp Thursday to negotiate with the Sherpas and encourage them to return to work.

But while Nepal's government has been heavily criticized for not doing enough for the Sherpas in the wake of last week's disaster, the deadliest ever on the mountain, one top official blamed the walkout on "hooligans."

Read more...
E-mail Print PDF

Australia says cost not a concern in MH370 search

AFPAFP – 5 hours ago
  • Australian Minister for Defence David Johnston speaks (L) as former Defence Force Chief Angus Houston (R) listens at RAAF Base Pearce in Bullsbrook, Western Australia on March 31, 2014

    AFP News/Paul Kane - Australian Minister for Defence David Johnston speaks (L) as former Defence Force Chief Angus Houston (R) listens at RAAF Base Pearce in Bullsbrook, Western Australia on March 31, 2014

Australia said Wednesday cost was not a concern in the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, after the mini-submarine plumbing the depths of the Indian Ocean for wreckage ended its ninth mission empty-handed.

Searchers were also investigating "unidentified material" which washed up on the country's southwest coast to see if it was linked to the Boeing 777, which vanished on March 8 with 239 people aboard.

But officials cautioned it may be unconnected to the plane.

Australia is leading the multinational search, and bearing many of the costs of the mission expected to be the most expensive in aviation history.

"There will be some issues of costs into the future but this is not about costs," Defence Minister David Johnston told reporters in Canberra.

Read more...
E-mail Print PDF

First sign of S.Korea ferry disaster was call from a frightened boy

ReutersBy By Narae Kim and Meeyoung Cho | Reuters – 4 hours ago

  • Police officers are seen as a rescue and salvage team helicopter (top) flies over …

By Narae Kim and Meeyoung Cho

Police officers are seen as a rescue and salvage team helicopter (top) flies over a port where family members of missing passengers from the capsized passenger ship Sewol gathered to wait for news from rescue and salvage teams, in Jindo April 22, 2014. REUTERS/Kim Hong-JiSEOUL (Reuters) - The first distress call from a sinking South Korean ferry was made by a boy with a shaking voice, three minutes after the vessel made its fateful last turn.

He called the emergency 119 number which put him through to the fire service, which in turn forwarded him to the coastguard two minutes later. That was followed by about 20 other calls from children on board the ship to the emergency number, a fire service officer told Reuters.

The Sewol ferry sank last Wednesday on a routine trip south from the port of Incheon to the traditional honeymoon island of Jeju.

Of the 476 passengers and crew on board, 339 were children and teachers on a high school outing. Only 174 people have been rescued and the remainder are all presumed to have drowned.

Read more...
E-mail Print PDF

MH370 passenger’s partner tells of strange email from sacked Fox officer

The Malaysian InsiderThe Malaysian Insider – 6 hours ago
  • MH370 passenger’s partner tells of strange email from sacked Fox officer

MH370 passenger’s partner tells of strange email from sacked Fox officerThe partner of an American passenger aboard the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 has spoken about how a Fox executive who was recently sacked by the news station had contacted her offering to raise funds on her behalf.

Sarah Bajc, whose partner Philip Wood is among the 239 people on board the missing plane, told the Sydney Morning Herald (SMH) that she had replied an email from Darlene Tipton, vice-president of Fox's standards and practices department, who offered to raise millions of dollars to help her.

Read more...
E-mail Print PDF

Singapore ‘closely monitoring’ respiratory coronavirus after death in Malaysia

By | Yahoo Newsroom – Wed, Apr 16, 2014
  • A microscopic image of the MERS-CoV. (Desination Sante photo)

    Yahoo Newsroom/Destination Sante - A microscopic image of the MERS-CoV. (Desination Sante photo)

Hospitals in Singapore are on alert and are testing patients who show symptoms of a travelling respiratory coronavirus that has claimed the life of one man in Malaysia so far.

In a statement on Wednesday, the Ministry of Health said the Malaysian who succumbed to what is called the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) had travelled to Saudi Arabia on an Umrah pilgrimage — one that is done on a smaller scale compared to the better-known Hajj.

Read more...

Page 1 of 25